These madeleines burst with bright lemon flavors and teeter that classic madeleine line between cake and cookie. Madeleines are always best eaten the day they are made, which works perfectly with a batter that can sit in the fridge for several days and still perform like a champ.


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From Rebecca: "When we lived in Beijing we would go to Maison Boulud for cocktails and fresh-made madeleines. My only regret is that the restaurant didn’t open sooner in my China tenure so this could have been a weekly occurrence."

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MADELEINE MAKING TIPS
I file madeleines under the same folder as I do macarons and 
meringues (and I’m not talking things that start with ‘M’). I’m talking 
technique. They’re the kind of recipes that don’t have a lot of 
ingredients, but it’s the technique that makes them fail or succeed.
 
•Use a nonstick madeleine pan. Invest in some really good nonstick 
madeleine tins. I don’t like to have you buy extra equipment, but 
you’ll save yourself some heartache, as I’ve found even the most 
painstakingly perfectly-prepared pan can produce madeleines 
that stick.
 
•Since nonstick madeleine tins are darker in color than stainless-
steel tins, they bake at a lower temperature. If using a stainless-steel 
tin that isn’t nonstick, butter and flour the crap out of it and 
increase the oven to 400°F (204°C) and bake for several 
additional minutes.
 
•Chill your pan and batter and don’t skip either step. 
 
•Madeleine tins vary in size and depth. It’s important that the batter 
is placed at the deepest part of the well and that you don’t even 
it out or make it tidy. If your tin is slightly larger or smaller than 3¼ 
x 1½–inch (8.3 x 3.7–cm), adjust your batter per cookie and also 
adjust your bake time.

 

MAKES 24 MADELEINES

You will need:
8 tablespoons (115 g) unsalted butter, really softened and cut into 8 pieces
2 large eggs, room temperature
⅔ cup (128 g) granulated sugar
1 tablespoon (15 ml) whole milk, room temperature
1 tablespoon (9 g) lemon zest
1 teaspoon vanilla bean paste or real vanilla extract
⅔ cup plus 1 tablespoon (101 g) all-purpose flour
1 tablespoon (9 g) cornstarch
½ teaspoon baking powder
½ teaspoon sea salt

For the glaze:
1¼ cups (163 g) powdered sugar
3 to 4 tablespoons (45 to 60 ml) milk, or more to thin
1 tablespoon (9 g) lemon zest
  1. To make the cookies, grease two 3¼ x 1½–inch (8.3 x 3.7–cm) nonstick madeleine tins and place in the freezer for at least 30 minutes. If your room temperature butter isn’t soft enough to easily smear on a plate, then give it 10 seconds on high in the microwave to give it the correct consistency. Set aside.
  2. In an electric mixer fitted with the whisk attachment, whisk the eggs and sugar on high for about 5 minutes, or until pale yellow and thick like mayonnaise. Add in the milk, lemon zest and vanilla and run the machine on low for 1 minute more.
  3. In a small bowl, whisk together the flour, cornstarch, baking powder and salt. Add the flour mixture and softened butter to the egg mixture and run the mixer on low for about 40 seconds. The mixture will be smooth and creamy with some small butter bits visible. Cover tightly with plastic wrap and store in the fridge for at least several hours or ideally overnight.
  4. Preheat your oven to 375°F (190°C).
  5. Add a heaping tablespoon (14 g) of batter to each madeleine well. Place the batter in the deep end of each well, not the middle. Do not smooth or flatten.
  6. Bake one tin at a time in the center rack of the oven for 10 minutes. When done, the madeleines will be golden around the edges and puffed up in the middle. Let the cookies cool in the tin for 10 minutes before turning out onto a rack. Place some parchment underneath the cooling rack.
  7. To make the glaze, in a small bowl, whisk together the powdered sugar, milk and lemon zest. Add more milk, in 1-teaspoon increments, to thin to the desired consistency. You want the glaze to lightly coat the entire cookie. Dip each madeleine in the glaze, letting the excess glaze fall back into the bowl, and then place the cookie back on the rack for the glaze to set.

TIP:

This is  a great recipe to swap in other citrus in  place of the lemon. Think blood orange, Cara Cara orange, Meyer lemon or key lime.

These madeleines burst with bright lemon flavors and teeter that classic madeleine line between cake and cookie. Madeleines are always best eaten the day they are made, which works perfectly with a batter that can sit in the fridge for several days and still perform like a champ.
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